UPDATE: Longhorn Network

As noted in our last update, we sent a proposal on Aug. 31 to ESPN, which is negotiating on behalf of the Longhorn Network. That proposal offered to give ESPN its own digital channel for the Longhorn Network, widely available to Suddenlink customers who wanted it. We told ESPN they could make this channel available for free or set whatever price they liked — and keep all revenues, including all advertising revenues. Under that proposal, Suddenlink would have made no money.

More than a month later, we finally received a written response from ESPN, rejecting that proposal and extending a different one. ESPN’s latest proposal — like their previous proposals — would force all Suddenlink TV customers to take and pay for the Longhorn Network, whether they want it or not. That is simply unacceptable.

Many broadcast and cable networks — especially sports networks — are already quite costly and those costs are often increasing faster than the rate of inflation. We will not force our customers to take another sports network. We are, however, ready and willing to negotiate an agreement that gives our customers a choice.

UPDATE: Longhorn Network

In Suddenlink’s ongoing efforts to make the Longhorn Network available on fair and reasonable terms to customers who want it, we sent a new offer on Aug. 31 to ESPN, which is negotiating on behalf of Longhorn. In fact, we sent the offer twice — by fax and overnight delivery — and have confirmations of receipt for both.

This new offer would give ESPN its own digital channel for Longhorn, widely available to Suddenlink’s customers who want it. We told ESPN they could make this channel available for free or set whatever price they like — and keep all revenues, including all advertising revenues. Under this offer, Suddenlink would have made no money.

So far — a week later and counting — the response from ESPN has been … chirping crickets. Not a single word.

We remain ready and willing to negotiate.

Longhorn Network

To the best of our knowledge, of the five-largest TV service providers in Texas — Time Warner, DirecTV, Dish, Comcast, and Suddenlink — none have reached an agreement with the Longhorn Network.

Suddenlink would very much like to make this network available on fair and reasonable terms to our customers who want it. In fact, we have told ESPN, which is negotiating carriage on behalf of the Longhorn Network, that we would be delighted to sign an agreement with them like the one we signed with the NFL Network last year. So far, ESPN has refused that offer.

In the meantime, virtually all Longhorn football games will be on channels that Suddenlink already carries, such as ABC, ESPN, and FOX.