Seasonal ‘Sun Outages’ May Affect TV Viewing

sun-earth

Twice a year, during the fall and spring, TV watchers may experience some degree of interference on some channels due to a phenomenon known as “sun outages.” The following Q&A will help you understand what they are and how they could affect you.

What is a sun outage?

A sun outage is an interruption in TV signals caused by interference from solar radiation. The interference is caused when the sun is in direct line with a communication signal and the sun’s radiation overwhelms it.

How does this affect watching TV?

During this time, people with cable or satellite TV service may experience interference on some channels that can affect picture quality and sound. The picture, for instance, may pixilate slightly, or clicking sounds may be heard. In some cases, picture or sound may completely drop for a few minutes.

Sun outages do not affect Internet or phone service.

How long does the interference last?

Such interference can last up to several minutes a day.

When will this interference happen?

This spring, sun outages may affect some channels – though only intermittently and generally for only a few minutes at a time – between roughly Feb. 29 and March 10. Typically, the effects, if visible, will occur between 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. CT.

What should you do?

If you experience picture or sound interference during these times, please be patient. Your service should return to normal after a short while.

Seasonal ‘Sun Outages’ May Affect TV Viewing

the-sun-from-earth-in-space-300x168

Twice a year, during the fall and spring, TV watchers may experience some degree of interference on some channels due to a phenomenon known as “sun outages.” The following Q&A will help you understand what they are and how they could affect you.

 

What is a sun outage?

A sun outage is an interruption in TV signals caused by interference from solar radiation. The interference is caused when the sun is in direct line with a communication signal and the sun’s radiation overwhelms it.

How does this affect watching TV?

During this time, people with cable or satellite TV service may experience interference on some channels that can affect picture quality and sound. The picture, for instance, may pixilate slightly, or clicking sounds may be heard. In some cases, picture or sound may completely drop for a few minutes.

Sun outages do not affect Internet or phone service.

How long does the interference last?

Such interference can last up to several minutes a day.

When will this interference happen?

This fall, sun outages may affect some channels – though only intermittently and generally for only a few minutes at a time – between roughly Sept. 27 and Oct. 16. Typically, the effects, if visible, will occur between 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. CT.

What should you do?

If you experience picture or sound interference during these times, please be patient. Your service should return to normal after a short while.

Drone Technology is Changing the Sports World

FYI_8-3

As technology expands, the way we watch TV will also continue to advance. This year, professional sports coverage began incorporating drones to cover major events. From the Kentucky Derby to the Arnold Palmer Invitational, the unmanned aircrafts provide coverage not accessible before.

An article from the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA) notes, however, that we will have to wait until after more flexible regulations are passed before we see drones at larger sporting events.

Seasonal ‘Sun Outages’ May Affect TV Viewing

Sun

Twice a year, during the spring and fall, TV watchers may experience some degree of interference on some channels due to a phenomenon known as “sun outages.” The following Q&A will help you understand what they are and how they could affect you.

What is a sun outage?

A sun outage is an interruption in TV signals caused by interference from solar radiation. The interference is caused when the sun is in direct line with a communication signal and the sun’s radiation overwhelms it.

How does this affect watching TV?

During this time, people with cable or satellite TV service may experience interference on some channels that can affect picture quality and sound. The picture, for instance, may pixilate slightly, or clicking sounds may be heard. In some cases, picture or sound may completely drop for a few minutes.

Sun outages do not affect Internet or phone service.

How long does the interference last?

Such interference can last up to several minutes a day.

When will this interference happen?

This spring, sun outages may affect some channels – though only intermittently and generally for only a few minutes at a time – between roughly Feb. 28 and March 11. Typically, the effects, if visible, will occur between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT.

What should you do?

If you experience picture or sound interference during these times, please be patient. Your service should return to normal after a short while.

‘Sun Outages’ May Affect TV Viewing

the-sun-from-earth-in-space

Twice a year, during the fall and spring, TV watchers may experience some degree of interference on some channels due to a phenomenon known as “sun outages.” The following Q&A will help you understand what they are and how they could affect you.

What is a sun outage?

A sun outage is an interruption in TV signals caused by interference from solar radiation. The interference is caused when the sun is in direct line with a communication signal and the sun’s radiation overwhelms it.

How does this affect watching TV?

During this time, people with cable or satellite TV service may experience interference on some channels that can affect picture quality and sound. The picture, for instance, may pixilate slightly, or clicking sounds may be heard. In some cases, picture or sound may completely drop for a few minutes.

Sun outages do not affect Internet or phone service.

How long does the interference last?

Such interference can last up to several minutes a day.

When will this interference happen?

This fall, sun outages may affect some channels – though only intermittently and generally for only a few minutes at a time – between roughly Oct. 5 and Oct. 10. Typically, the effects, if visible, will occur between 12 p.m. and 9 p.m. CT.

What should you do?

If you experience picture or sound interference during these times, please be patient. Your service should return to normal after a short while.

Sites Help Parents Navigate Media

child-using-computer-650x0

A recent study from the American Academy of Pediatrics found that the average 8-year old spends seven hours a day consuming digital entertainment in the form of TV, computers, smart phones and video games.

With summer vacation nearing, it’s a good time to discuss appropriate TV viewing and to activate or update parent control settings. Healthy Kids recommends several resources designed to help parents and caregivers navigate children’s media exposure.

For more tips, see our past posts, “Parental Controls at Your Fingertips” and “TV Boss Helps Manage Kids’ Viewing.”

Seasonal ‘Sun Outages’ May Affect TV Viewing

Twice a year, during the spring and fall, TV watchers may experience some degree of interference on some channels due to a phenomenon known as “sun outages.” The following Q&A will help you understand what they are and how they could affect you.

What is a sun outage?

A sun outage is an interruption in TV signals caused by interference from solar radiation. The interference is caused when the sun is in direct line with a communication signal and the sun’s radiation overwhelms it.

How does this affect watching TV?

During this time, people with cable or satellite TV service may experience interference on some channels that can affect picture quality and sound. The picture, for instance, may pixilate slightly, or clicking sounds may be heard. In some cases, picture or sound may completely drop for a few minutes.

Sun outages do not affect Internet or phone service.

How long does the interference last?

Such interference can last up to several minutes a day.

When will this interference happen?

This spring, sun outages may affect some channels – though only intermittently and generally for only a few minutes at a time – between roughly Feb. 22 and March 15. Typically, the effects, if visible, will occur between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT.

What should you do?

If you experience picture or sound interference during these times, please be patient. Your service should return to normal after a short while.

A Few Tweaks Can Improve TV Picture

USA Today offers simple tips for when and how to use (and not use) the contrast, brightness, backlight, color, and sharpness options on your TV.

Can It Get Any Better Than HDTV?

With its widescreen, movie theater-like format, sharp images and superior sound quality, HDTV has taken home television viewing to an exciting level. The TV-making industry rarely rests for long, however.  USA Today takes a look at OLED and 4K (a.k.a., Ultra HD), two technologies that developers are hoping will soon find a way into your home theater.

TV-related Injuries Up, Tips to Prevent

According to a report published in the journal Pediatrics, between 1990 and 2011 injuries attributed to falling televisions increased by 95% in the United States.

Possible causes the researchers cited included the increase of TV ownership, the popularity of new flat panel styles, which tip more easily than heavier CRT displays, and placing televisions on unstable furniture.

Steps to minimize the risk of such injuries include anchoring or wall-mounting TVs, and avoiding the top of the television as a storage spot for remote controls, toys or items that might entice a child to climb.

In earthquake-prone regions, consider securing TVs, even in kid-free areas.