Beware ‘Solutions’ to Non-Existent Problems

Recently, a number of websites and blogs have published false warnings about two of Suddenlink’s online services and offered fixes or remedies for problems that don’t exist.

The potential danger is that these remedies could be back-door attempts to launch malicious software (commonly known as “malware”) — which, once it’s downloaded, could compromise your computer, Internet experience, and/or private information.

In other words, certain sites make false claims about Suddenlink; offer a “fix” (e.g., virus scan software) to a non-existent problem; and then potentially use that “fix” (if you click on it or download it) to infect your computer.

These sites might also try to engage you in a chat or other form of direct communication in order to capture your personal information.

So be careful out there, and please — if you read warnings about Suddenlink — give us a chance to address any concerns you might have by contacting us directly, through email, chat, or phone.

Additional information follows about two Suddenlink services that are a common subject of the false reports, namely: (1) a Suddenlink toolbar and (2) a search service that helps customers find the websites for which they’re looking, if they accidently type an invalid domain name or Web address. Both services are common practice across the Internet, and we’ve been offering them for several years now. Importantly, if customers don’t want to use these services, they don’t have to.

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The Suddenlink toolbar is what’s commonly known as an optional browser plug-in. It helps customers easily and quickly access popular destinations and functions, such as a Google-powered search bar, Suddenlink email, Suddenlink2GO, local weather and news, etc. During installation, the toolbar also offers customers the option to make “home.suddenlink.net” the home page for their browser.

But as noted earlier, if customers don’t want the toolbar, they don’t have to take it. And if they choose it, but then later decide they don’t want it — or decide they want to set their home page to something else — they can easily make those changes through their browser settings.

For instance, if you use Internet Explorer 8 as your browser:

    To uninstall the Suddenlink toolbar, go to “Tools” and then select “Manage Add-ons.” Find Suddenlink Toolbar in the list, select it, then click the “Disable” option at the bottom of the window.

    To change your home page, go to “Tools” and then select “Internet Options.” The first option on the “General” tab will be to set or change the homepage. Simply type the homepage you wish to use, then click “Apply.”

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We also offer a service that provides options to customers who accidently type an invalid domain name or Web address.

Here’s an example of how it works: Let’s say you meant to type “Disney.com” into the URL (or Web address) bar in your browser. But because you were moving fast or were distracted, you typed “Disney.co,” instead.

    Without the service we provide, you would see what’s commonly known as a “HTTP/DNS/404” or “Page not found” error message — forcing you to go back, manually check and correct the Web address.

    With our service, you would see a list of results — on the site search.suddenlink.com — including a link to disney.com, making it easy to click on the option you want and get to where you wanted to go in the first place.

Importantly, we do not store any results from this service, nor do we track any customer activity.

The overwhelming majority of our customers keep this service, presumably because of the convenience it provides them. But for the few who don’t want it, we provide an easy way to turn it off. Go to the bottom of any results page that’s generated when you type an invalid domain name; look for the link titled “Disable this service”; click on it – and you’re done.

Comments

  1. Lyndsey Smith says

    Here’s an idea. Stop being shady shysters with this Toolbar and redirect junk that no one signed up for. Idiots. You should be in jail for what you do and how you try to slander these websites informing people about your stupid shady tactics.

    • Pete says

      The toolbar is only installed if someone chooses to install it. The search service is automatic for the sake of convenience — and only relevant if an invalid domain name is typed into the browser. Furthermore, as noted, both services can be discontinued at any time.